Does Forsyth County Schools have a ‘zero-tolerance' weapons policy on guns?

The answer is maybe.

“Each situation is handled on an individual case, not a blanket zero policy,” said Jennifer Caracciolo, a spokeswoman for the county school district.

The reason I asked was because a Texas congressman has introduced a bill that would deny federal funding to any public school that punishes students for drawing pictures of guns, pretend to have an imaginary weapon or are "brandishing a pastry or other food which is partially consumed in such a way that the remnant resembles a gun."

Congressman Steve Stockman, R-Friendswood, calls the "Student Protection Act," a “bill to protect the rights of children."

It also would deny federal funding to any school that punishes a child for “using a pencil, pen or other writing utensil to simulate a firearm,” as reported by www.courthousenews.com.

In March, a 7-year-old elementary student in Baltimore was suspended for two days after playing with his pastry at school and instead of his intention, a “mountain,” the pastry turned out to look more l like a gun.

Last month, several students at a Washington state elementary school were suspended after shooting Nerf guns at school.

So the question is, if schools adopt a “zero-tolerance” weapons policy are they in essence outlawing “harmless expressions of childhood play?”

Email your answers to aldo@forsythherald.com; tweet me at @forsythherald or leave your response in the section below.

Ray is the Publisher Emeritus for Appen Media and the Herald newspapers.

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