CUMMING, Ga. — David Marsh was sworn in July 22 as Cumming’s new police chief.

Mayor Troy Brumbalow, who presided over the ceremony, asked Marsh not only to swear to protect the city, but swear not to continue vocal support of his alma mater, Auburn University. 

Marsh gets grief regularly from Brumbalow, a University of Georgia alum, yet his new office already has Auburn tigers paraphernalia sprinkled around the room. 

More important than the issue school loyalty will be Marsh’s performance as the new chief, replacing Casey Tatum, who held the position since 2012

Marsh has already set a goal to put body cameras on all officers by the end of the year. He plans to bring the procurement item before the Cumming City Council at its next session, a process that is still new to him, he said. 

“Most of us are just more comfortable being outside working for a living,” Marsh said. “But I got a lot of experience doing internal affairs and training, which helped make that transition a little bit easier.”

Marsh worked in the Forsyth County sheriff’s office for the last 15 years and helped them transition to using body cameras, he said. He worked his way up from the county jail, to patrol work, to a Drug Enforcement Agency task force, and he was promoted to sergeant rank two years ago. 

After his promotion he worked more in training officers, which he said was one of his favorite jobs he’s done in his career. Teaching became one of his passions. 

“One of the things I did at the sheriff’s office that I really enjoyed was teaching active shooter response classes,” Marsh said. “You know, ‘What should you do if you’re present and there’s workplace violence happening? Or if you’re in a school or even in a commercial business… how should you best protect yourself and others?’”

Doing more with the community will be his primary goal as the new chief, he said. Currently the agency does not have a Facebook page, and Marsh said his office can do more to be accessible and open to people who live and work in Cumming.

Marsh’s main mentor during his time working for the county was Sheriff Ron Freeman, who was present for Marsh’s swearing in. Originally known to Marsh as Capt. Freeman, he was elected sheriff in 2016. 

“He was a big help to me as a young deputy … and he’s always been a person who will answer my phone call, give me advice,” Marsh said. “I spoke to him at length before I even applied for this position, and he couldn’t have been more complementary and helpful in the transition.”

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