Dunwoody Perimeter Chamber: Returning to the Perimeter

Clockwise from top left, moderator Tamira Moon, Northside Hospital’s Dr. Kathleen Funk, Morehouse School of Medicine representative Brian Rivers and Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital CEO Heather Dextor discuss how the coronavirus pandemic has impacted the healthcare industry.

DUNWOODY, Ga. —The Dunwoody Perimeter Chamber has been working to get the community back to work with a series of virtual events discussing how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the Perimeter workforce.

Each video of the Return to the Perimeter series features a panel of industry experts focusing on an aspect of returning to work and rebuilding the post-coronavirus economy. The events are streamed live on the chamber’s Facebook page, where viewers can also access past events for free.

“As the state of Georgia works to reopen during these unpredictable times, the chamber thinks it’s imperative to discuss what rebuilding after a pandemic entails across industries,” Chamber President and CEO Stephanie Freeman said. “We hope that series will serve as a valuable resource to local businesses as they strategize what reopening will look like for them individually.”

The first event looked at how technology will shape workflow moving forward. The next featured a panel of some of the Perimeter’s biggest employers: Perimeter Mall, State Farm and Cox Enterprises.

The most recent event focused on the healthcare industry, with representatives from Northside Hospital, Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital and Morehouse School of Medicine.

The three experts agreed that COVID-19, both the disease itself and its broader impact, was unlike anything they had ever seen before.

Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital CEO Heather Dextor described how in the early days of the pandemic there was not enough testing or supplies.

“In the initial days of seeing COVID patients, we had a very hard time sourcing what we needed for our caregivers,” she said. “We couldn’t find personal protective equipment, so we had to start looking for alternatives, and ultimately asking our caregivers to reuse items that were not intended for reuse. Those were huge challenges.”

Morehouse School of Medicine Cancer Health Equity Institute Director Brian Rivers explained how the pandemic had shifted medical education and research to a mostly virtual environment.

“A lot of the processes were able to be converted to the virtual platform with the same level of integrity that we would have if we were working in person,” Rivers said. “But there was a difference, and it definitely took some adjustment, especially as it relates to really engaging patients in the clinical setting.”

Northside Hospital’s Dr. Kathleen Funk said that collaboration between hospitals and doctors across the globe was crucial to adapting to the unprecedented challenge of COVID-19. She also urged the community to not let the pandemic deter them from seeking the care they need.

“Unfortunately, with a lot of people in the community not wearing masks and social distancing, at this point you’re more likely to get COVID-19 from a community source or close contact than by coming to the hospital,” Funk said. “If you need to come, please come.”

Going forward, the panelist speculated technology and tele-medicine will play a much larger role in care delivery.

“We at Emory have been working on tele-health for about 10 years now,” Dextor said. “It’s been very slow progress. We feel like we’ve made more progress in 10 weeks than in the previous 10 years.”

However, not all of the lasting impacts will be positive, Funk explained.

“Fiscally, we’re seeing hospitals, especially rural hospitals, closing their doors,” she said. “Some hospitals just like some other businesses will not recover. While the government is trying to help out, it’s a drop in the bucket.”

The next event in the Returning to the Perimeter Series will be Thursday, June 25 at 11 a.m. with Dunwoody Mayor Lynn Deutsch. Deutsch will discuss what she’s learned from the past three months and what’s ahead for the remainder of th

DUNWOODY, Ga. —The Dunwoody Perimeter Chamber has been working to get the community back to work with a series of virtual events discussing how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the Perimeter workforce.

Each video of the Return to the Perimeter series features a panel of industry experts focusing on an aspect of returning to work and rebuilding the post-coronavirus economy. The events are streamed live on the chamber’s Facebook page, where viewers can also access past events for free.

“As the state of Georgia works to reopen during these unpredictable times, the chamber thinks it’s imperative to discuss what rebuilding after a pandemic entails across industries,” Chamber President and CEO Stephanie Freeman said. “We hope that series will serve as a valuable resource to local businesses as they strategize what reopening will look like for them individually.”

The first event looked at how technology will shape workflow moving forward. The next featured a panel of some of the Perimeter’s biggest employers: Perimeter Mall, State Farm and Cox Enterprises.

The most recent event focused on the healthcare industry, with representatives from Northside Hospital, Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital and Morehouse School of Medicine.

The three experts agreed that COVID-19, both the disease itself and its broader impact, was unlike anything they had ever seen before.

Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital CEO Heather Dextor described how in the early days of the pandemic there was not enough testing or supplies.

“In the initial days of seeing COVID patients, we had a very hard time sourcing what we needed for our caregivers,” she said. “We couldn’t find personal protective equipment, so we had to start looking for alternatives, and ultimately asking our caregivers to reuse items that were not intended for reuse. Those were huge challenges.”

Morehouse School of Medicine Cancer Health Equity Institute Director Brian Rivers explained how the pandemic had shifted medical education and research to a mostly virtual environment.

“A lot of the processes were able to be converted to the virtual platform with the same level of integrity that we would have if we were working in person,” Rivers said. “But there was a difference, and it definitely took some adjustment, especially as it relates to really engaging patients in the clinical setting.”

Northside Hospital’s Dr. Kathleen Funk said that collaboration between hospitals and doctors across the globe was crucial to adapting to the unprecedented challenge of COVID-19. She also urged the community to not let the pandemic deter them from seeking the care they need.

“Unfortunately, with a lot of people in the community not wearing masks and social distancing, at this point you’re more likely to get COVID-19 from a community source or close contact than by coming to the hospital,” Funk said. “If you need to come, please come.”

Going forward, the panelist speculated technology and tele-medicine will play a much larger role in care delivery.

“We at Emory have been working on tele-health for about 10 years now,” Dextor said. “It’s been very slow progress. We feel like we’ve made more progress in 10 weeks than in the previous 10 years.”

However, not all of the lasting impacts will be positive, Funk explained.

“Fiscally, we’re seeing hospitals, especially rural hospitals, closing their doors,” she said. “Some hospitals just like some other businesses will not recover. While the government is trying to help out, it’s a drop in the bucket.”

The next event in the Returning to the Perimeter Series will be Thursday, June 25 at 11 a.m. with Dunwoody Mayor Lynn Deutsch. Deutsch will discuss what she’s learned from the past three months and what’s ahead for the remainder of th

DUNWOODY, Ga. —The Dunwoody Perimeter Chamber has been working to get the community back to work with a series of virtual events discussing how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the Perimeter workforce.

Each video of the Return to the Perimeter series features a panel of industry experts focusing on an aspect of returning to work and rebuilding the post-coronavirus economy. The events are streamed live on the chamber’s Facebook page, where viewers can also access past events for free.

“As the state of Georgia works to reopen during these unpredictable times, the chamber thinks it’s imperative to discuss what rebuilding after a pandemic entails across industries,” Chamber President and CEO Stephanie Freeman said. “We hope that series will serve as a valuable resource to local businesses as they strategize what reopening will look like for them individually.”

The first event looked at how technology will shape workflow moving forward. The next featured a panel of some of the Perimeter’s biggest employers: Perimeter Mall, State Farm and Cox Enterprises.

The most recent event focused on the healthcare industry, with representatives from Northside Hospital, Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital and Morehouse School of Medicine.

The three experts agreed that COVID-19, both the disease itself and its broader impact, was unlike anything they had ever seen before.

Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital CEO Heather Dextor described how in the early days of the pandemic there was not enough testing or supplies.

“In the initial days of seeing COVID patients, we had a very hard time sourcing what we needed for our caregivers,” she said. “We couldn’t find personal protective equipment, so we had to start looking for alternatives, and ultimately asking our caregivers to reuse items that were not intended for reuse. Those were huge challenges.”

Morehouse School of Medicine Cancer Health Equity Institute Director Brian Rivers explained how the pandemic had shifted medical education and research to a mostly virtual environment.

“A lot of the processes were able to be converted to the virtual platform with the same level of integrity that we would have if we were working in person,” Rivers said. “But there was a difference, and it definitely took some adjustment, especially as it relates to really engaging patients in the clinical setting.”

Northside Hospital’s Dr. Kathleen Funk said that collaboration between hospitals and doctors across the globe was crucial to adapting to the unprecedented challenge of COVID-19. She also urged the community to not let the pandemic deter them from seeking the care they need.

“Unfortunately, with a lot of people in the community not wearing masks and social distancing, at this point you’re more likely to get COVID-19 from a community source or close contact than by coming to the hospital,” Funk said. “If you need to come, please come.”

Going forward, the panelist speculated technology and tele-medicine will play a much larger role in care delivery.

“We at Emory have been working on tele-health for about 10 years now,” Dextor said. “It’s been very slow progress. We feel like we’ve made more progress in 10 weeks than in the previous 10 years.”

However, not all of the lasting impacts will be positive, Funk explained.

“Fiscally, we’re seeing hospitals, especially rural hospitals, closing their doors,” she said. “Some hospitals just like some other businesses will not recover. While the government is trying to help out, it’s a drop in the bucket.”

The next event in the Returning to the Perimeter Series will be Thursday, June 25 at 11 a.m. with Dunwoody Mayor Lynn Deutsch. Deutsch will discuss what she’s learned from the past three months and what’s ahead for the remainder of the year.

Carson Cook is an Editor with Appen Media Group and covers Johns Creek, Dunwoody and Fulton County.

More from this section

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.