Questions:

North Fulton has received an unprecedented amount of state money for transit in the past year. What are your thoughts on future funding for transportation? 

Are schools receiving enough funding and support at the state level? What concerns do you have with public education and how can you help?

Is the state giving away too much in incentives to lure business? What is the best approach to remain business-friendly without giving away the farm?

 

State Senator, 48th District:

 

Matt Reeves (R):

Question 1: I am an infrastructure Republican. Taxpayers deserve a return on their investment of current taxes. I believe in an “all of the above” effort on transportation solutions to unclog traffic arteries, protect our quality of life, catch up on the growth we have experienced, and prepare for the future. 

Question 2: Due to the large number of students in our area, and the success of our schools, I believe that our schools are good candidates for additional State of Georgia funds, and I will advocate for additional school safety and other education funds that will reach our classrooms. 

Question 3: I want to keep our state income tax going down, and keep Georgia’s tax, regulatory and government climate favorable to job growth and economic development. We need to focus on business and quality of life issues for small businesses and their employees, such as low taxes, jobs, education, public safety, traffic solutions and healthcare. 

 

Zahra Karinshak (D)

Question 1: I am happy to see the boost in transit bond money in the 2019 budget. We must continue to fund transportation projects to ensure we are not crippled by gridlock. As your senator, I will seek and evaluate a host of transportation projects such as light rail and transit expansion options. 

Question 2: Simply stated: no. The formula used to fund public education, the QBE, has not been updated since 1985. This is unacceptable. I will work to fully fund our schools to give students a 21st century education so they are equipped to compete in the world economy. 

Question 3: Companies receiving tax incentives must be held accountable to create jobs, raise wages, and contribute to the region’s tax base. If companies fail to meet certain standards, which must be tracked, incentives should be withheld. At all times, I will work to be a responsible steward of our taxpayer dollars. 

 

State Senator, 56th District:

 

John Albers (R) (I)

Question 1: I have been a leader in this area and was proud to support the comprehensive transportation and transit plan this year, which will allow for direct support to our area. This will include Bus Rapid Transit and additional lanes to improve commute times and improve public safety.

Question 2: The state fully funded education in 2018, and during my tenure in office, we added considerable new funding every year. I lead the committee for school safety in the Senate, which is a top priority. I will assure everyone gets a first-class education in a safe and welcoming environment. 

Question 3: I led the efforts to analyze every incentive/credit and determine a ROI (return on investment) for Georgia. This process included eliminating some and expanding others. I authored legislation to put a proactive business case and review process into place to assure best practices, fiscal accountability and transparency. 

 

Ellyn Jeager (D)

Question 1: We need to find transportation options that use 21st century technology that will ease congestion on our major arteries. I also support the expansion of Bus Rapid Transit and other public transportation options.

Question 2: The schools are receiving funding based on formulas from 1985, meanwhile the cost of education has risen substantially. Salaries need to be competitive so they attract the best and brightest. I would support funding our schools at a 2018 level, improving technology in the classroom and offering wrap-around services for K-12. 

Question 3: The return on investment for bringing business to North Fulton has supplemented our economy and provided high paying jobs for many Georgians. The best approach to remain business friendly is to keep discriminatory legislation from interfering with Georgia’s competitive economy.

 

Questions

Are you satisfied with the direction of the country’s leadership? What does control of the House means for the future of the country?

Are schools receiving enough funding and support at the federal level? What concerns do you have with public education and how can you help?

At the federal level, what can you do to help local businesses and ensure Georgia remains a business-friendly state?

 

U.S. House District 6

 

Karen Handel (R)(I):

Question 1: Republicans’ policies have achieved tax cuts, historically low unemployment, highest wage increases in nine years, and more jobs open than people looking for work. Democrats have promised to repeal the tax cuts — costing the average 6th District family $4,400 per year — and to eliminate employer-sponsored health insurance.

Question 2: State and local tax dollars fund the majority of education. In Congress, I helped pass the SAFER Schools Act to provide new resources for school safety initiatives. Schools in Georgia are receiving $2.5 million in federal grants to ensure that our schools are as safe as possible. 

Question 3: In Congress, we passed tax cuts and eased onerous regulations that have fueled strong economic growth. Taxes are lower for our Main Street businesses, fostering job creation, expansion, higher wages, and even enhanced benefits. Georgia is also benefitting from federal grant dollars for Ga. 400 and the Savannah Port.

 

Lucy McBath (D):

Question 1: Congress has failed to solve the issues that matter most to people in Georgia’s 6th District. For those that have healthcare, it is too expensive, and people with preexisting conditions are left vulnerable. On the economy, Congress continues to give tax breaks to corporations without focusing on middle class families that make up my district.   

Question 2: Teachers do so much to support our students, and they are often left underfunded and under-supported. I plan to ensure the federal government plays a role in supporting teachers by providing the resources they need. I also would do all that I can to improve other services such as the expansion of after-school programs.

Question 3: As a former Delta flight attendant, I understand how important it is to keep Georgia businesses strong. I support the federal government expanding access to capital of Georgia entrepreneurs to start or expand their own business, and I also believe the administration must stop provoking other countries into trade wars that hurt our local economy.

 

Questions:

North Fulton has received an unprecedented amount of state money for transit in the past year. What are your thoughts on future funding for transportation? 

Are schools receiving enough funding and supwport at the state level? What concerns do you have with public education and how can you help?

Is the state giving away too much in incentives to lure business? What is the best approach to remain business-friendly without giving away the farm?

 

State Senator, 21st District

 

Brandon Beach (R) (I):

Question 1: We are seeing the results of the passage of HB170 with new capital construction projects being built that will ease congestion and increase mobility. This year, North Fulton and Ga. 400 will receive $100 million for transit infrastructure to build new stations for bus rapid transit. This investment was great for North Fulton taxpayers who have been paying for transit for years with very little investment in return.

Question 2: This year we fully funded the QBE formula for public education. I believe that public education should be working with the private business community to make sure we are educating our kids for 21st century jobs. We must make students aware of the opportunities in these areas and provide them with the skill set to fill these jobs.  

Question 3: Incentives play a role, but the best way to lure companies is offer lower taxes, less regulation, cutting edge infrastructure and a quality workforce. We have the busiest airport in the world, excellent education, diverse culture, affordability and a great quality of life. Coupling incentives with our assets is why Georgia has been the number one state to do business the last five years.

 

Nicole Nash (D):

Question 1: With a rapidly growing population, transportation funding will continue to be a growing part of the budget. We need to explore public-private partnerships to bring funding from the private sector to critical transportation projects, like expanding public transit. We must also look beyond Fulton County when making transit decisions.

Question 2: I’m deeply concerned that our education system continues to be undermined by those who want to make money instead of educating children. The funding equation Georgia uses is outdated and based on old information. I’ll fight to truly fully fund Georgia schools, including raising faculty and hourly-worker pay and benefits.

Question 3: Businesses that come to Georgia need to be financially responsible, environmentally responsible and safety-conscious. As a city councilperson, I learned a lot about how businesses can engage with communities to benefit people and the private sector. The best approach to benefit everybody is bringing stakeholders together to create solutions.

 

Questions:

North Fulton has received an unprecedented amount of state money for transit in the past year. What are your thoughts on future funding for transportation? 

Are schools receiving enough funding and support at the state level? What concerns do you have with public education and how can you help?

Is the state giving away too much in incentives to lure business? What is the best approach to remain business-friendly without giving away the farm?

 

Georgia House District 49

 

Chuck Martin (R) (I)

Question 1: The state commitment of $100 million to provide two additional lanes north/south on Ga. 400 for bus rapid transit and commuters is a good example of spending that benefits two modes of transportation. The state should continue to partner in future locally supported projects to provide congestion relief. 

Question 2: Due to our robust economy in Fulton County, our schools are well funded and performing well, with schools in our district having graduation rates in the high 90s. I’m concerned teachers are required to teach to tests rather than teaching students how to learn — parents and teachers need more flexibility and choice to prepare students for the workforce. 

Question 3: Georgia’s economy is growing and unemployment, at 3.7 percent in September 2018, is lowest in over a decade due in part to statutory incentives and because small businesses are thriving. For Georgia to retain its business-friendly reputation, we must continue to focus on people, allowing them to start small businesses and thrive, and to continue to improve on our public and post-secondary education for Georgians. 

 

Krishan A. Bralley (D)

Question 1: My understanding is that the recent financial windfall from the state comes at least in part from a $5 per night per room hospitality tax that Georgia enforced a few years ago. It is an excellent example of how revenue can be raised in a way that does not cause a huge controversy in order to solve problems. 

Question 2: It is my view that we spend way, way too much on defense at the federal level. If any of those astronomical amounts were diverted to the states for education, that would be my ideal. The best aspect of Georgia schools is the employees who work in them. 

Question 3: It does absolutely no good for Georgia to attract businesses whose cost to the state exceeds the tax revenue they bring. We ought to court companies who will pay livable wages so the state will avoid subsidizing employee incomes; and we should emphasize worker training in concert with any commercial partnerships.

 

Georgia House District 48

 

Betty Price (R) (I):

Question 1: Transportation infrastructure and congestion relief funding comes from many sources. The state allocated $100 million for transit, primarily for bus rapid transit that will help the 400 corridor. A federal grant of $187 million was allocated for managed lanes on Ga. 400. Voter-approved TSPLOST projects are improving locally designated roads. Future projects are based on need and available resources. 

Question 2: Our school system receives the largest portion of the state budget to prepare our youth. We have provided $16 million for school safety grants. We must maintain the HOPE scholarship based on merit to reward hard-working students. We should continue on the path toward less testing via the Innovative Assessment pilot. 

Question 3: We must balance tax incentives with the financial benefit that will come to our communities. Film is one example of incentivizing an exciting field in Georgia along with training residents to obtain those jobs. We have to respond to the needs of our citizens while being cautious against picking winners and losers in the economic market. 

 

Mary Robichaux (D):

Question 1: Fortunately, Roswell has made vast improvements to its transportation system along highway 400. However, these projects can move too slowly and leave North Fulton citizens in terrible commutes. We must consider solutions for travel along the north-south pattern and the east-west pattern. We need a multi-pronged solution and therefore a multi-pronged funding model.

Question 2: While it’s a strong first step, fully funding Georgia’s schools under a model written in 1985 doesn’t go far enough to give teachers the tools they need to prepare students for a 21st century economy. Updating the funding formula is long overdue and will be one of my first priorities.  

Question 3: While I’m encouraged by Georgia’s business-friendly atmosphere, I am concerned that not enough everyday Georgians are sharing in the added wealth being brought to our state. We should make sure that tax breaks for businesses are being leveraged to incentivize wage growth and employee benefits in-state, instead of simply relocating low-paying jobs here.

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