Ken Davis takes over as GNFCC chairman

Renasant Georgia president used to leadership roles

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ALPHARETTA, Ga. – Ken Davis, Georgia president for Renasant Bank, has taken on the role of Greater North Fulton Chamber of Commerce’s chairman of the board. It is a role he slips into easily, as it is one he has played many times before when called upon.

Davis’ current resume shows he has served three years as chairman of the board for the Roswell Visitors and Convention Bureau, which oversees both tourism and economic development for that city.

He has served on numerous boards where he lends his expertise, ideas and most importantly, his time.

Now as chamber board chairman, he sees his first task as keeping ongoing chamber initiatives on track.

“Some things we are doing, we want to continue doing such as education, workforce development, health care and technology,” Davis said.

Education and workforce development are almost joined at the hip. There are already a number of colleges and technical schools offering classes in North Fulton such as DeVry University, Reinhardt University, Georgia State University’s campus on Ga. 400 and Emory University’s continuing education program.

Then there is the $25 million footprint Gwinnett Technical is putting down on Milton Parkway in Alpharetta.

“These are all great assets to help drive economic development here in North Fulton,” Davis said. “If we can provide the trained workforce for the growing tech industry, the health care industry, the more it will benefit all businesses here.

“There are a lot of energies and synergies at work here, and it is our job to help coordinate them to build our economy.”

Another part of the chamber’s job is to get the word out about all the good things going on in this community.

“We have a story to tell both locally and regionally, and now it needs to continue to the Southeast,” he said. “And while we continue to make ourselves attractive to the relocation market, we must increase our efforts to retain existing businesses.

“That may not make the big headlines, but when a business has the opportunity to look around but decides to stay, that is a huge economic win as well.”

North Fulton Chamber President Brandon Beach said he is ecstatic to have Davis take over the chairman’s gavel for 2014-15.

“He has been on our board, he knows the job, he knows the community and he knows how to get things done,” Beach said. “More than that, he has lived in this community for 20 years. There are not many people we need to know that he can’t call up on the phone.

“He is very involved in the community. With his contacts and visibility in the community, we as an organization are lucky to have him.”

One area the North Fulton business community has to do better is branding the region the way other regions have. He points to Silicon Valley for technology in California and the Research Triangle in Raleigh-Durham area as examples.

“That can gather synergy from existing businesses to bring similar or ancillary businesses to North Fulton. As you gain strength, you build on that strength,” Davis said.

“So it is a matter of developing a brand for all North Fulton. And there are a lot of success stories to tell – quality schools here, technical companies, corporate relocations, excellent parks and recreation – the list is endless.”

There are challenges that must be met also. Transportation is a sore spot, but as Davis points out:

“It’s a nice problem to have. It means people want to be here.”

Long-term, North Fulton wants to recruit a four-year college to bring its campus here, Davis said. Throw in MARTA expansion, too, he said.

“Another challenge is affordable housing that will serve our workforce. One way to eliminate a long commute is to live where you work,” he said. “And you have to remember, the emerging demographic for younger workers shows they don’t want a ‘five-four-and-a-door. [Five windows upstairs and four windows downstairs, i.e. the standard single-family home].

“They want a lifestyle that does not include a picket fence. These are the realities we have to prepare for,” Davis said.

Ken Davis takes over as GNFCC chairman

Renasant Georgia president used to leadership roles

By HATCHER HURD

hatcher@northfulton.com

ALPHARETTA, Ga. – Ken Davis, Georgia president for Renasant Bank, has taken on the role of Greater North Fulton Chamber of Commerce’s chairman of the board. It is a role he slips into easily, as it is one he has played many times before when called upon.

Davis’ current resume shows he has served three years as chairman of the board for the Roswell Visitors and Convention Bureau, which oversees both tourism and economic development for that city.

He has served on numerous boards where he lends his expertise, ideas and most importantly, his time.

Now as chamber board chairman, he sees his first task as keeping ongoing chamber initiatives on track.

“Some things we are doing, we want to continue doing such as education, workforce development, health care and technology,” Davis said.

Education and workforce development are almost joined at the hip. There are already a number of colleges and technical schools offering classes in North Fulton such as DeVry University, Reinhardt University, Georgia State University’s campus on Ga. 400 and Emory University’s continuing education program.

Then there is the $25 million footprint Gwinnett Technical is putting down on Milton Parkway in Alpharetta.

“These are all great assets to help drive economic development here in North Fulton,” Davis said. “If we can provide the trained workforce for the growing tech industry, the health care industry, the more it will benefit all businesses here.

“There are a lot of energies and synergies at work here, and it is our job to help coordinate them to build our economy.”

Another part of the chamber’s job is to get the word out about all the good things going on in this community.

“We have a story to tell both locally and regionally, and now it needs to continue to the Southeast,” he said. “And while we continue to make ourselves attractive to the relocation market, we must increase our efforts to retain existing businesses.

“That may not make the big headlines, but when a business has the opportunity to look around but decides to stay, that is a huge economic win as well.”

North Fulton Chamber President Brandon Beach said he is ecstatic to have Davis take over the chairman’s gavel for 2014-15.

“He has been on our board, he knows the job, he knows the community and he knows how to get things done,” Beach said. “More than that, he has lived in this community for 20 years. There are not many people we need to know that he can’t call up on the phone.

“He is very involved in the community. With his contacts and visibility in the community, we as an organization are lucky to have him.”

One area the North Fulton business community has to do better is branding the region the way other regions have. He points to Silicon Valley for technology in California and the Research Triangle in Raleigh-Durham area as examples.

“That can gather synergy from existing businesses to bring similar or ancillary businesses to North Fulton. As you gain strength, you build on that strength,” Davis said.

“So it is a matter of developing a brand for all North Fulton. And there are a lot of success stories to tell – quality schools here, technical companies, corporate relocations, excellent parks and recreation – the list is endless.”

There are challenges that must be met also. Transportation is a sore spot, but as Davis points out:

“It’s a nice problem to have. It means people want to be here.”

Long-term, North Fulton wants to recruit a four-year college to bring its campus here, Davis said. Throw in MARTA expansion, too, he said.

“Another challenge is affordable housing that will serve our workforce. One way to eliminate a long commute is to live where you work,” he said. “And you have to remember, the emerging demographic for younger workers shows they don’t want a ‘five-four-and-a-door. [Five windows upstairs and four windows downstairs, i.e. the standard single-family home].

“They want a lifestyle that does not include a picket fence. These are the realities we have to prepare for,” Davis said.

BUS 06-18-14