Eagles Beak Park in Cumming plans include BMX, archery

Passive park will also host canoe, model airplanes, trails, camping

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CUMMING, Ga. — Bikes and arrows are in store for the new Eagles Beak Park.

Forsyth County Commissioners were updated, on the passive park’s progress at their Sept. 25 work session.

No action was taken, but commissioners and county legal staff will review two proposals.

Under the first proposed memorandum of understanding between the county and Forsyth County BMX Corp. (FCBMX). About 3 acres of land for two facilities at the Eagle’s Beak property would be leased on a yearly basis with an eye to attract national and regional bike races.

Also proposed for the 225-acre property are meadows that will be set aside for the Forsyth County Archery Club.

The archery range could bring regional tournaments to Forsyth County.

The conceptual master plan for this hobby park was first approved by commissioners in May. In addition to the possibility of a BMX bike area and archery area, plans includes a series of nature trails, primitive camping along with the current remote control model airplane area and a new canoe launch.

A canoe launch will be part of the Etowah Blueway, a series of canoe launches along the Etowah River.

Restroom facilities are proposed throughout the park and a concession stand near the non-motorized BMX track area.

Since plans are not finalized, more activities could be added to this property, county parks officials said. The plans would not affect next year’s budget because they would not be in operation until 2014, said county Recreation and Parks Director Jerry Kinsey.

Ryan Kramer, president of FCBMX, said children of all ages would participate in the bicycle sport and the economic impact to Forsyth County would be great.

“This is a facility we will come in and build,” Kramer said. “We are asking the county for a few pieces to help us get started, but for the most part we will build, operate and run this facility.”

One of the closest tracks for a mountain cyclist is at the Big Creek Park in Roswell.

But there is nothing on the north side of Atlanta for BMX riders, Kramer said.

Kramer said fees would only be collected during race days, so that staff can be hired to keep track of points.

The typical race would cost $10. A $2 fee would be for practice nights.

The facility would be open during park hours and FCBMX wants to provide weekly racing programs for an average of 150 riders.

Kramer said the economic impact could be between $1 million to $2 million based on figures provided by Peachtree City and other counties that hold national, regional and statewide BMX events.

“People coming into town to stay at our hotels, eat at our restaurants, visit our local retailers,” Kramer said. “We want to provide revenue back to the county

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